Wordless Wednesday

WW is a simple blog post featuring a photo which conveys a message that speaks for itself without using words.
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For all the rule breakers, of which I am one, please feel free to add all the words you want.
Make sure you leave a link to your post here and I’ll visit your Wordless Wednesday post.

PURPLE HEART DAY

Purple Heart Day on August 7 commemorates the creation of the oldest American military decoration for military merit. The Purple Heart honors the men and women who are of the Military Order of the Purple Heart. During the American Revolutionary War, the Badge for Military Merit decorated six known soldiers.

General George Washington created the Badge of Merit in 1782. The honor was to be presented to soldiers for “any singularly meritorious action.” Its design included a purple, heart-shaped piece of silk bound with a thin edge of silver. Across the face, the word Merit was embroidered in silver. While the badge symbolized the courage and devotion of an American Patriot, no one knows who designed the award.

Until Washington’s 200th birthday, the Purple Heart persisted as a Revolutionary War footnote. Through the efforts of General Douglas MacArthur, the U.S. War Department created the Order of the Purple Heart. Today the medal bears a bust of George Washington and his coat of arms.

While an accurate and complete list of names no longer exists, National Geographic recently estimated that nearly 1.9 million Purple Hearts have been awarded since its creation. It’s the oldest U.S. military honor still bestowed upon service members today. Until 1944, the Purple Heart recognized service members commendable actions as well. Then in 1944, the requirements limited the award to only those wounded or killed in combat.
Purple Heart Firsts

William Brown and Elijah Churchill received the Badge of Military Merit during the Revolutionary War when the award first replaced the Fidelity Medallion.
Army General Douglas MacArthur received the first modern-day Purple Heart.
Army Lt. Annie G. Fox received the Purple Heart during World War II for her actions during the attack on Pearl Harbor.

HOW TO OBSERVE  PurpleHeartDay

Honor everyone who has received a Purple Heart. Learn more about the Military Order of the Purple Heart. Use #PurpleHeartDay to post on social media.
PURPLE HEART DAY HISTORY

Since 1932, Purple Heart Day has been celebrated on both Washington’s birthday and Valentine’s Day. Some states and cities observed Purple Heart Day in their own way at different times throughout the year. Each declaration encouraged citizens to support wounded veterans with the purchase of a purple viola.

No matter when the day was observed, it recognizes the merit, and more importantly, the men and women killed and wounded in combat who earned the badge of honor. As the day evolved, it more commonly was observed on the day of the Purple Heart’s creation.

8 Comments on “Wordless Wednesday

  1. What a lovely post, Mike. A good thing to remember. It is a badge of honor.Thank you for joining the Wordless Wednesday Blog Hop.Have a fabulous Wordless Wednesday, Mike and Celestine. w-) w-)

  2. Thank you for posting this history of the medal, i don't know of anyone personally who has one, but if i ever meet a winner i can promise i will be sure to let him/her know how grateful i am for all the sacrifices s/he made.

  3. Sandee,that is one that in a way I an glad I never earned.:)I'm sure my B-I-L Alan did.:( :X :-* :-f :-h d-)

  4. Veronica Lee,Thank you.this is one of my ways of Honoring my Military Brothers and Sisters.:) :DF :X :-* :-f :-h d-)

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